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Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
both for coming in. my next guest says hsbc is guilty of the worst behavior any bank can possibly be guilty of. we'll tell you how a $1.9 billion fine is hardly enough and i could not agree more coming up next. smiles make more smiles. when the chocolate is hershey's. life is delicious. you disgust me. prove it. enough is enough. d-con baits are specially formulated to kill in one feeding. guaranteed. d-con. get out. >> eliot: so let's take a look at what eric holder and lanny's department of justice has done. they brought a case against roger clemens and lost. they brought a case against john edwards and lost. they brought countless frivolous drug cases to pad their stats. what about torture? they said they wanted to be forward-looking which defies the job of a prosecutor. they brought no serious cases against the wall street banks whose misconduct led to the cataclysm of 2008. they have done nothing about walmart's total disregard for the foreign corrupt practices act or against news corp. for the rampant hacking and corruption
both for coming in. my next guest says hsbc is guilty of the worst behavior any bank can of. we'll tell you how a $1.9 billion fine is hardly enough and i could not agree more coming up and good luck. ♪ [ boy 1 ] hey! that's the last crescent. oh, did you want it? yea we'll split it. [ female announcer ] made fresh, so light buttery and flakey. that's half that's not half! guys, i have more! thanks mom [ female announcer ] pillsbury crescents. let the making begin [ singing christmas carols in background ] aunt sally's singing again. it's a tradition honey. [ singing christmas carols ] mmmm. [ female announcer ] make new traditions with pillsbury grands! cinnamon rolls. >> eliot: so let's take a look at what eric holder and lanny's department of justice has done. theyey brought a case against roger clemens and lost. they brought a case against john edwards and lost. they brought countless frivolous drug cases to pad their stats. what about torture? they said they wanted to be forward-looking which defies the job of a pr
, it was scandal unpunished. fines against hsbc, expensive mistakes at citi corp, jpmorgan chase cries out for real reform and real arrests of senior executives. where is the justice and where is the justice department? joining me now, dennis kelleher, president and ceo of better markets. dennis, is it fair to say that by in large, wall street and senior executives continue to get off almost scot free? >> the objective evidence proves that to be true. the real question is when is the law going to be applied to wall street like it is applied to the rest of main street and the rest of america. it is interesting, at the conference announcing the ubs settlement of $1.5 billion, the head of the criminal division said crime on wall street will not be tolerated. while he was indicting a japanese subsidiary of a swiss bank. and i know that geographically challenged they may think they're getting closer to wall street but wall street's much closer than either of those places. i can't wait for them to find it. >> eliot: i suppose some
market news, a lot of talk about china this morning. a final reading of hsbc's manufacturing purchasing manager's survey for china rising in november, first time above the key 50 mark which indicates expanding rather than contraction. it's been since october of last year. also abroad greece announcing it will buy back bonds through a dutch auction. the set up whether allow athenss to assess the level of demand before setting a final bryce for the deal. part of the country's efforts to cut its about a along debt. and in germany, merkel is not ruling out the possibility of notifying greece some of its debt once athens finances are in better shape. angela merkel told a german tabloid that the question of the so-called haircut can be revisited. in the past, merkel's government had ruled out forgiving any debt. >> in corporate new, ubs is reportedly close to a settlement. the "new york times" says the swiss bank is expected to pay horn $450 million over claims that some of its employees submitted false libor rates. that's pretty huge story and we will take a look and ten to see what happens
that hsbc agreed to last week to settle that money laundering probe. >> crazy thing that stock's up. it's leading the exchange there today because people had been expecting maybe a slightly higher fine even than that. three times the amount. it was supposedly taking place for five to seven years, 30 to 40 traders have left. pretty pervasive. >> i wonder how much they -- they make money or lose money after -- >> after all was said and done. $1.5 billion. >> probably lost. they did well. the libor stuff, if you can set rates -- >> well, and the crazy thing, it affects so many different instruments and so many people and so many businesses. >> right. >> i don't know that you could ever actually figure out all the implications from it. >> right. from everyone. and in a related story this morning, the f.t. reports that the new york fed was warned as early as mid 2008 that banks might have been misrepresenting their libor borrowing rate. that was to aid their own trading positions. and that date is much earlier than previously known. according to the f.t., yep, then-new york fed president tim
will further dent profit growth this year. and hsbc reportedly might pay a fine of $1.8 billion as part of a settlement with u.s. law enforcement agencies. the settlement could be announced as soon as next week and has to do with money laundering lapses. the deal could be a test case for just how big a signal prosecutors want to send to halt the list of flows of money through u.s. banks. but that was billion with a b. let's get a check on the markets this morning. after the moves we saw yesterday, the dow up triple digits at one point. that the poebts you can see that the futures are indicated higher once again after it closed up about 85. in europe, right now at least there are some green arrows. best performer among those three indexes is the dax in germany. up 75. you also see gains with the cac in france and the ftse in london. in asia overnight, you did see slight drop by the hang seng and shanghai, those were big gainers the day before. and in japan, the nikkei up by 0.8%, kospi up 1%. oil prices this morning are trading up about 28 cents, 88.16. the ten year note this morning is
of papers. "san francisco chronicle." $1.9 billion settlement with british giant hsbc. they were charged with enabling drug cartels to launder money through the american financial system. >> is that bad? >> billions have dollars on behalf of iran. >> they keep moving the lines. >> i wish the regulators would pass a freakin law and stick with it. >> put your earpiece in so they can tell you to be quiet. >> to laund-if you can't laundey through mexican cartels, what can you do these days? >> sharing with marketers and other third parties without notifying parents. >> this is just not good. >> only 20% of children's apps provide disclosures about that data collection. >> this is the cutest thing. the pope is tweeting. "usa today," pope benedict will make history tomorrow when he takes to twitter to answer his pari parishioner's questions. he already has 900,000 followers in eight languages on his handle at pontiff-x. >> he follows me. >> 900,000 for the pope? beaver's got like 25 million. you would think the pope would be -- >> get off his back! >> i want to do that at some point. i know we
the focus turns once you have the news of monti's resignation. one thing we do want to note, hsbc had its rating cut from double a minus to double a. abercrombie & fitch, open humor out with a notice saying the retailer looks to the markets over the holidays. s intermec is looking to be up in 2013. jim, back to you. >> let's shift to the bonds and dollars. >> you know, looking at the ten-year, seeing it hovering around 160, is about as shocking as the sun coming up in the morning. but nonetheless, last week on interday trades, looked like we were going to close in the high 150s, which would have taken us back many more months. you can see the closing yield chart, going back all the way to august 1st. now, look at boon yields. political issues. you can have the best-laid plans by central banks in the end. ballot boxes, politics, it can get messy. think about what's going on here. now, if we look at the boon going back to august 1st, it's a differe bit of a different pattern. it is hovering at the lowest yields. it did close below yields since august. if we switch gears a bit, move a little
of the big corporate news and this one is actually a global corporate story. >> hsbc. we're talking about paying $1.9 billion in the money lawnering lapses. a brirchb lender admitting to a breakdown of controls, in a statement announcing a deferred payment. yesterday standard chartered agreed to pay $27 million agreeing that it violates sanctions against iran and two other international companies. >> if you're an international bank and you prael without getting into this kind of trouble? >> no. >> can you actually operate without money laundering? >> i'm just saying, if you're going to be in business in all these types of markets, isn't this going to happen? >> aren't there sxwier countries that would be probably -- that it would stead if you don't want any business tale. >> was there a fascination in this country about whether you want to indict the whole institution or what happens systemically. >> is this your sequel? >> i was on the phone last night. one of the two publishers that are left. we have other news on wall street this morning, morgan stanley said to be considering asking th
. but it adds -- and then you've got all the stuff you were bringing up, hsbc, you've got the high frequency trading. you got the flash crash. you got the idea that it's not an even playing field. >> and then when interest rates are 1% or 2% people feel like no one knows what they should do. >> to what end? i think a big part of it is you have to step back and say what's the bigger picture? what's the concern? a lot of people feel like the system is rigged. so that, you know, one of the things that was interesting to me at e-trade was watching the evolution of self-directed to a need for guidance. sort of some level of guided advice. >> do you believe the -- do you believe that the retail investor has a fair shot? against the institutional investor? >> no. no. i do not. >> i do not. i think that at the end of the day to level the playing field, there are certain products and services that you can buy self-directed. >> shouldn't we be trying to level the playing field? >> of course. of course. >> but the answer is it's never going to be fair -- >> the same information as an institution -- >>
's second largest economy. hsbc's preliminary monthly purchasing manager index rose 50.9 from november's 50.5. also, china story. apple's iphone is officially on sale in china starting today. that should help apple reverse a slide in its market share in that really important area. but analysts say the key to apple's future in china is a tie-up with the telecom operator china mobile. the two have been in talks for years but haven't yet come to any agreement. and you wonder how much china, how much do they want? how much do you have to give up to get a part over there? almost everything, right? >> pretty much. all of your data, everything -- >> their way, they get your technology. do they get the lion's share of -- do they split anything down the middle? >> anyway let's talk about facebook. a major facebook lockup expiration is happening today. early employees' investors will get their first chance to sell about 156 million facebook shares since the ipo back in may. and joining us now on the "squawk" newsline, henry blodget, the ceo and editor in chief at business insider. good morning. >> go
in december, according to hsbc. china pmi rising to 51.5. and that is a result of manufacturing in china in a year and a half. the shanghai index ended the day about 1.6% higher, highest close since june 20th. it has been a nice run that we've seen also in china to our point before. it's been up 16% since its four-year low in december. >> for the year the index is up 3% right now. for those who missed it, this will be the first annual gain in, i believe, three years' time. this has not been a positive stock market, despite the economy growing 7%, 8%, 9% or so. as the chinese president said this morning, there will be policies put in place to support growth. and whatever nervousness in the transition is going to fade and policymakers can get more involved. >> we've seen this play out in the metal stakes. the best fourth quarter in two years, up 56%. iron ore prices. that's a real lead on demand. and especially as the chinese government makes all these nods toward urbanization plans and the need to update and invest in infrastructure. these are the areas where you want to be. >> yeah. also
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)